How to Write a Cover Letter to Land a Remote Job?

Now, what if you don’t have any experience with remote work? Don’t panic just yet, because you can instead put the spotlight on some of your skills that could be relevant to remote work. | Photo by  Javier Molina  on  Unsplash

Now, what if you don’t have any experience with remote work? Don’t panic just yet, because you can instead put the spotlight on some of your skills that could be relevant to remote work. | Photo by Javier Molina on Unsplash

If you had been using the same cover letter for in-house jobs, it’s no surprise you’re not hearing back from remote job position you applied for. 

The bad news is that there’s a high chance your cover letter is to blame for your current misfortune. And out of all the arduous tasks involved with job-searching, polishing up a cover letter is one that inspires the most dread.

Well, I can’t blame you. Online, you can find a whole lot of good advice on finding a job, writing a good cover letter, and landing a remote role. But tips on how to put all of that together, can be a little hard to come by. 

Don’t fret just yet, because this guide will show exactly how you can tailor a winning cover letter so you can land that remote job you’ve been eyeing for.

Here are some tips on how you can put together a cover letter that’s tailored for a remote job:

Understand the Job Description


There’s no sugar-coating it: Hunting for a remote job can be a pretty tedious task. But guess what? That doesn’t always have to be the case!


Instead of wasting your time (and the hiring manager’s) applying to hundreds of jobs you’re probably not that into, slow down and take some time to thoroughly read and understand each job description. Consider gathering the following key pieces of info from a job description:

  • List down top qualities employers need from you. Ever read phrases like “detail-oriented” or “willing to add to their knowledge base and skills”, riddled throughout a job posting? These are the specific traits you need to pull out. 

  • Include the tools/software you have proficiency in. Does the position require you to be good with tools like Photoshop or Autocad? Do they need someone who knows how to use remote project management applications like Asana or Todoist

Make sure to list down all the tools/software mentioned in the ad, and then include your skill level on each of them. This way, it’s easier to organize and determine your strengths. 

  • Follow instructions in the ad. Imagine being weeded out of a job posting because you failed to follow the instruction to add the word “hula-hoop” to your subject line. Yup, such a thing can get your resume instantly rejected. 

Thing is, no matter how silly or arbitrary these measures can be, they’re there for a reason: To make it easy for recruiters to choose candidates who actually pay attention to and follow instructions - traits that a good employee must possess. 

List Down Experiences and Skills Relevant to Remote Job

Okay, so you may not have to completely rewrite your existing resume after all. However, you’ll have to make a few adjustments to highlight experiences and skills you’ve previously uncovered in the first step.

As with any job search, your previous work experience is going to carry a lot of weight. So if you’ve had some remote work under your belt, don’t forget to highlight them in your cover letter. Make sure to highlight successful projects you’ve completed. This way, you can prove to your potential employer that you’ve already worked successfully in a remote work environment and that you can handle the challenges involved with not working side-by-side with co-workers.

Now, what if you don’t have any experience with remote work? Don’t panic just yet, because you can instead put the spotlight on some of your skills that could be relevant to remote work.

Jot down skills you think are necessary to work efficiently as a remote employee. It could be things like:

  • Time management

  • Organization

  • Communication

  • Self-motivation  

If you think you possess any - or all - of these skills, don’t hesitate to write them down in your cover letter. Plus points if you include real examples of how you’ve applied said skill(s) to make a difference in your previous job.

For some, this part of the cover letter can be a little tricky to polish up. That’s okay. If you think you’re having trouble, you can always get the help of a pro writer who can assist with your resume and cover letter writing needs. Take a look at professional writers services reviews to find out which service is right for you.

Craft an Outstanding Digital Portfolio

While your cover letter is necessary for recruiters and hiring managers, your digital portfolio is what’s really going to help you get noticed for a remote job position. By spending equal time polishing up both your cover letter and digital portfolio, you’re creating the complete package employers are sure to fight over.

Your digital portfolio can be as simple as a single-page highlight per skill, or a robust portfolio showcasing all your achievements.  

For starters, you can try out a free portfolio site or spend some time creating your own website to showcase your skills, values, and experience. 

Once you do, remember to specify project details. This includes your role, how you handled the situation, and the outcome.

Don’t worry if the end-result isn’t so great. You can always mention what you learned and how you’d manage things differently next time.


Now that you know how to craft a winning cover letter for a remote job, you’re all set to revisit your job hunt with a fresh outlook. Pretty soon, you’ll be the dream candidate any recruiter or hiring manager will want to check out and hire in no time!

Guest writer Carol Duke is very keen on teaching students new, effective ways of learning. When not freelancing and blogging on education-related matters, Carol enjoys traveling, taking immense pleasure from visiting new countries. You can follow her on Twitter.